Easy Read guide to anxiety management for adults with learning disabilities

If you or somebody you know are feeling anxious, these four activities can be used to help you or them to feel calmer and more relaxed.

Published on

My name is Aimee Nuttall.

I am the Occupational Therapist in the Day Opportunities Clinical Team at ECL.

For many people, life has changed a lot because of COVID-19 and now, more than ever, we all need to look after our Mental Health.

I have developed an Easy Read Guide to Managing Anxiety to help people manage their anxiety at home. This guide is suitable for adult’s with Learning Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders (including Asperger’s).

What is anxiety?

What is anxiety 1 image.
What is anxiety 2 image.

Anxiety can make you think and feel different things.


What is anxiety 3 image.

This can stop you doing things you would normally do.


If you are feeling anxious, you might:

Heart.

Have a fast heartbeat.


Breath.

Breathe faster.


Feel sick.

Feel butterflies in your tummy or feel sick.


Sleeping.

Have trouble sleeping.


Moody

Feel moody.


Sad

Feel sad.


Why?

Lots of things can make you feel anxious.

Sometimes, you may not know why you are feeling anxious.

Here are some Easy Read documents that explain this in more detail.

What does this guide include?

Breathing.

Breathing Exercises

Ways of changing your breathing to help you feel calm.


Senses.

Grounding with your senses

Using sight, touch, noise, smell and taste to focus on things around you.


Guided visulisation.

Guided Visualisation

Which can help you imagine that you are somewhere else.


Progressive Muscle Relaxation.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

An activity that reduces stress in your body by tensing and relaxing your muscles.


Information for families and carers

In the guide, you might notice that some of the activities are shorter than you would expect. This is done for a reason – I want them to be accessible for people who may not be able to concentrate for a long period of time or follow a large number of instructions.

Support.

Some of the activities will require support from another person, and they can be adapted to suit the person using them.


Easy Read.

For the other activities, someone with a mild Learning Disability should be able to follow and complete them independently.


You.

Remember, the activities might not work for everyone.

It is important to find out what helps you manage your anxiety.


I hope you find this guide useful.

I would love to hear your feedback. Please send an e-mail to Aimee.Nuttall2@essexcares.org.

comments powered by Disqus